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Day-Trip to Historical Koblenz, Germany

No matter where you are in Germany, or Europe for that matter, you don’t have to go far for a great day-trip. As I mentioned in my first blog, I love history, and visiting the over 2000 year-old city of Koblenz does not disappoint!

Koblenz was one of the first cities that I visited in Germany when I first came here back in January of 2013. Perhaps it was the excitement of being in a new country that makes me feel nostalgic towards the city, but it really is beautiful. Sadly, my photography skills weren’t the best back then, so I have only a few photos to show for it!

We were able to go back to Koblenz earlier this year in June. Our daughter was only a few weeks old, so I found myself a bit preoccupied during the day-trip, but my parents were visiting and it was nice to show them a place both me and my husband love.

Where is Koblenz?

Balduinbrücke, Baldwin Bridge, in Koblenz Germany
14th Century Balduinbrücke (Baldwin Bridge)

Koblenz is roughly 100km North-West of Frankfurt in the state of Rheinland-Pfalz. The city is in the beautiful wine country of the Rhine Valley, famously known for its Rieslings. Koblenz is also most known for being the city where the Mosel River flows into the Rhein creating the famous Deutches Eck (German Corner) landmark. And whether you decide to drive to Koblenz or take the train, it will be a scenic ride.

What to See in a Day

Whenever I get to take a day-trip to a new city, I try not to pack in too much. Instead, I find it most enjoyable to do one touristy thing and spent the rest of the time walking around and exploring. What I love about cities in Germany are their Fußgängerzones (Pedestrian Areas). Usually in the older parts of town, there are streets you can walk down with lots of nice shops, restaurants, café’s, etc, and there is no automobile traffic (besides necessary delivery vehicles). Koblenz is no exception to this and has a really beautiful old town to explore. Always be sure to bring good walking shoes because the old-cobbled streets are no joke!

As for the one tourist activity I would recommend, it would be to take the Seilbahn (cable car) up to the Ehrenbreitstein Fortress. Walking through the roughly 1000 year-old fortress offers a unique perspective to life in that era. Once you walk all the way through the fortress, the view of the city at the end is stunning. We also visited the Landesmuseum, which is part of the fortress, and it offered interesting exhibitions that would be really great for kids.

The Deutsches Eck

Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial Koblenz Germany
Kaiser Wilhelm Memorial

As you’re wandering through the Altstadt (old town) of Koblenz, a must-visit is the famous Deutsches Eck, where the Mosel River and the Rhein meet. Standing tall above the Deutsches Eck is its 37-meter tall Kaiser Wilhelm memorial. Kaiser Wilhelm became King of Prussia in 1861 and was Germany’s first Emperor in 1871. The statue was actually destroyed by US artillery in World War 2. While the French occupied the area after the war, they wanted to replace the statue but were unsuccessful. Today, a replica of the original statue has been standing since 1993 and it is a symbol of German reunification. Since 1990, October 3rd is celebrated as the Tag der Deutschen Einheit (Germany Unity Day) and it represents the day when East and West Germany were officially reunited following the fall of the Berlin Wall.

For more information about Koblenz, you can visit their English tourism website. It can tell you more about the main attractions in Koblenz as well as wineries and bikes paths in the area.

Are there any cities that you find yourself always wanting to go back to? Let me know in the comments!

Thanks for reading!

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One thought on “Day-Trip to Historical Koblenz, Germany

  1. I have not been to too many cities in Germany but I too really liked Koblenz. It is a very picturesque town, not too big but it has a lot to see. That being said, I also found Köln to be quite an impressive city with all the cathedrals, beautiful architecture and parks.

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